The Other Shoe Dropped

For a number of reasons, I’ve avoided talking about the news but now that it’s out on the web and other people are talking, I figured the time has come.

On Friday, around 3:30, I was called into my boss’s office and was fired. He didn’t explain why but had the HR folk hand me papers and some checks and told me to start cleaning out my office.

As has been speculated elsewhere, the final factor seems to be the misprint in the Golden Age Hawkman Archives. My superiors never talked to me about the problem that occurred, how something so seemingly obvious could be missed, nor did they seem interested. Instead, they saw this as a persistent pattern (meaning that other errors have occurred, something that happens when you produce as much as Collected Editions did in 2005) that wasn’t going to change even though we just changed the structure of the department, adding some much needed support staff, to make sure things like this wasn’t going to happen again. Management seemed unwilling to wait and see if things would improve.

Instead, by 5:30 I was packed and out the door. The news slowly spread over the weekend until it broke on the Internet at my pal Gormuu’s Marvel Masterworks board and Rich Johnston’s Lying in the Gutters. Gormuu wrote some lovely things as did many of the regulars on the board. Rich, I have to say, was surprisingly sensitive to me and even offered to delay the report a week if I wanted. Instead, I’d prefer the net folk read it, debate it and move on.

We had stuff already scheduled for the weekend so Deb saw to it I stayed out and about. We didn’t mention it at the Bar Mitzvah, the family party or the Church Volunteers’ Reception. Instead, we waited until a quiet moment on Sunday to tell the immediate family.

The reaction on line has been interesting. At Gormuu’s message boards, people were demanding that someone be fired for the Hawkman error and now that someone has been (more or less) they suddenly think they may have overacted. The debate at Newsarama was more positive and I was touched when Peter David came to my defense. All in all, I’m reminded of the third season West Wing episode when Josh discovers Lemonlyman.com and tries to interact with the community only to discover most are off their meds – an episode I re-watched only a week previous.

Since then, I have been flooded with kind e-mails from people throughout the various circles I travel. Freelancers I haven’t worked with in years reached out as well as others who were doing work for me last week. Friends from publishing, again including those I deal with regularly and others I haven’t chatted with in years, all got in touch. I feel most gratified by their support and offers to point me in various directions.

Which also means it’s time to figure out the next chapter of my career. It’s rather odd, in that my first day of unemployment marked the 22nd anniversary of my first joining DC and is also the week marking the fourth anniversary of my being dismissed by Bill Jemas at Marvel. All of which weighs somewhat heavily on my mind.

While I love comic books and would be happy finding a position at some company, I also truly enjoying publishing and would be pleased to land a place at a book or magazine house. Of course, these aren’t great times for publishing with consolidations occurring at most places so we’ll see what happens.

Short term, I am also working on finding some freelance writing to help fill the hours. While I still have my next Star Trek: Corps of Engineers in progress, that’s all I have confirmed. I did receive, yesterday, two offers for short works which will help to a degree. Once those become real, I’ll mention what they are.

Sadly, Deb and I have been through this before. The business world hasn’t necessarily been kind to her before the Marvel thing gave me a taste of the uncertainty and demoralizing aspects of job hunting. The kids understand how we adjust to accommodate the sudden reduction in income. We’re both very cognizant that we need to keep each other’s spirits up and that during the hunt there still needs to be downtime for mental health. I certainly have enough reading around the house and a ton of premium cable channels should it come to that. And I’ll keep up my political life and exercising at the gym and home chores, just shifting more of that stuff to daylight hours.

And we’ll still talk here.

77 thoughts on “The Other Shoe Dropped

  • January 11, 2006 at 10:28 am
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    Very sorry to hear about this. Best of luck in finding new employment (hopefully your next boss will be slightly less over-reactionary).

    -Andy Holman

  • January 11, 2006 at 10:47 am
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    Is the item used in Superman in the 40s still at the offices? Who would I contact about this if it is? Please e-mail me if you get the chance. Thanks again for helping me to share it- sorry I didn’t get to meet you!

  • January 11, 2006 at 11:44 am
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    Someone should be fired for a mistake in a Hawkman Archive? Anyone who said that should bloody well feel they overreacted! There’s a little thing called compassion that the reality TV generation could use a healthy slathering of.

    Extremely sorry to hear the news, Bob. You deserve far better. I hope your next employer is worthy of you.

  • January 11, 2006 at 11:58 am
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    Very disspiriting to hear, and obviously, you have my condolences. (As Brian observed when comparing it to my situation 16 years ago, “Well, at least they’ve apparently learned not to fire people on Christmas Eve, there’s that.” Cold comfort, I know.)

    I would have phoned, but I’ve had a bad case of laryngytis for the past week, so all you’d’ve heard would have been something unrecognizable on the other end of the line that sounds like a blown subwoofer. Still, let’s talk soon, pal, and never forget–being fired by DC CAN kick-start a great career. I’m living proof.

    Best,
    Mark Waid

  • January 11, 2006 at 1:33 pm
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    Tried to e-mail you when I first learned the news, but no luck on that.

    At any rate, my sympathies over the change of fortunes. I understand this sort of situation too well, and send best wishes for a speedy, on-yer-feet landing. And like the other soul said, may your next job be worthy of you.

    Yours,

    Dwight

  • January 11, 2006 at 1:53 pm
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    “Friends from publishing, again including those I deal with regularly and others I haven’t chatted with in years, all got in touch.”

    Hey friend! Read the news and was angered/saddened. I think we’ve all seen plenty of mistakes made in comic book production without somebody being fired over it (I wonder if a misprint in an Archive edition costs more to the company bottom line than chronically late shipping books…) I wonder why now is the time we see (over re-)action taken?

    Sorry it took your misfortune for me to come out of the woodwork, but I wanted to lend my moral support. Good luck and God bless, Bob. I’m certain you’ll find the perfect fit job sooner than later!

    Jerry Novick

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:01 pm
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    I just found out about the bad news. It is depressing to think about all the talented people, including yourself, who are devoted to this medium who have been undeservedly pushed out of the comics business over the years. You have my best wishes in finding new employment.–Peter Sanderson

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:04 pm
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    Bob,
    I am sorry about your situation. I am sure it will work out for the best.

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:05 pm
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    I can’t say that I’ve worked with you that much, just one a sole interview with the crew for the DC Encyclopedia, but as a fan and industry watcher I’ve always admired the work you’ve produced.

    I really started getting into your fiction, and part of me hopes this might lead to you pursuing that in a more full-time capacity. Like Waid said, sometimes these things help kickstart things that wouldn’t ordinairy have occured to you.

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:06 pm
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    As far as I’m concerned, it’s DC’s loss. You’ve always been one of the good ones, Bob, and I look forward to seeing what the next phase of your career will be.

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:27 pm
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    Man, that sucks. I’m really sorry to hear the news, Bob. Hopefully this will lead to bigger and better things for you in the new year. This business smells of bullshit to me to be frank.

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:31 pm
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    Fired because a couple of pages were printed out of order?

    If firings occurred every time some glitch of that nature happened all over publishing, the turnover would be tectonic in intensity.

    The problem is that such things, in our current 24/7 cycle world, get blown out of all proportion. 25 years ago, when you and I were just starting out in publishing, it would have taken weeks–if not months–for the reader feedback on this kind of thing to hit the offices and there would have been time to say, “OK, shit happens, we’ll work to improve”. Now, the feedback is nearly instantaneous and the relative anonymity of e-mail and newsgroups allows for a more vituperous response to such small scale stuff than is called for.

    And then management feels a need to let readership know it hears the complaints….and good people lose their jobs over piddleshit.

    I know you’ll bounce back, Bob. But it’s a shame it had to come to this. Where is DC going to find someone with your knowledge and insight to what the collector readership wants?

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:31 pm
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    Fired because a couple of pages were printed out of order?
    If firings occurred every time some glitch of that nature happened all over publishing, the turnover would be tectonic in intensity.
    The problem is that such things, in our current 24/7 cycle world, get blown out of all proportion. 25 years ago, when you and I were just starting out in publishing, it would have taken weeks–if not months–for the reader feedback on this kind of thing to hit the offices and there would have been time to say, “OK, shit happens, we’ll work to improve”. Now, the feedback is nearly instantaneous and the relative anonymity of e-mail and newsgroups allows for a more vituperous response to such small scale stuff than is called for.
    And then management feels a need to let readership know it hears the complaints….and good people lose their jobs over piddleshit.
    I know you’ll bounce back, Bob. But it’s a shame it had to come to this. Where is DC going to find someone with your knowledge and insight to what the collector readership wants?

  • January 11, 2006 at 2:31 pm
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    Fired because a couple of pages were printed out of order?
    If firings occurred every time some glitch of that nature happened all over publishing, the turnover would be tectonic in intensity.

    The problem is that such things, in our current 24/7 cycle world, get blown out of all proportion. 25 years ago, when you and I were just starting out in publishing, it would have taken weeks–if not months–for the reader feedback on this kind of thing to hit the offices and there would have been time to say, “OK, shit happens, we’ll work to improve”. Now, the feedback is nearly instantaneous and the relative anonymity of e-mail and newsgroups allows for a more vituperous response to such small scale stuff than is called for.

    And then management feels a need to let readership know it hears the complaints….and good people lose their jobs over piddleshit.

    I know you’ll bounce back, Bob. But it’s a shame it had to come to this. Where is DC going to find someone with your knowledge and insight to what the collector readership wants?

  • January 11, 2006 at 3:23 pm
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    Please add my and Robin’s voices to the very many supporting you during this time, Bob. We’ve no doubt you’ll find a position in very short order that suits your immense talents. I was wondering if you’re going to be considering making politics your full-time job now, but I guess not…

  • January 11, 2006 at 4:24 pm
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    Damn, damn, damn. I wrote something in the CBG column I just sent off today and posted the same bit on their message boards.

    This is about the third time I’ve thought about this today and, honestly, I just keep getting more angry about it. So, I’ll leave at “best wishes for the next chapter” and keep in touch.

    Tony

  • January 11, 2006 at 4:26 pm
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    I can’t help but thinking that if Bob had been able to continue the relationship he was building with fans of the online community back on the old official DC forums, it is likely that this wouldn’t have played out like it has. Only those of us who were around in those early days got to know Bob as the effective marketer and cheerleader of DC’s Archives and collected editions that he is. Congenial, knowledgeable, sturdy under the pressure and scrutiny of fandom because- no duh- he’s a fan himself. Naturally, these are all the things you’d want in somebody crafting your product and then proudly promoting it. He hasn’t been able to show off that role of insider/advocate like he used to, and for whatever reason, when that role was diminished it wasn’t replaced with anything fans were aware of or could understand.

    It’s hard to build up enthusiasm with silence, and without any direct access to fans, it’s not easy to find a soft place to fall when an honest mistake is made- and the GA Hawkman error was an honest mistake. Perhaps the next guy in line for Bob G’s duties will be able to engage the fanbase and act as proud papa to the Archives line- the fanbase craves such a person. And if that next guy needs any hints on how to pull it off, well…we know where to send them for advice. Because Bob was good at it.

    Anyways, I look forward to seeing you in February around the NY Con, Bob.

  • January 11, 2006 at 5:28 pm
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    This is the problem when one works for a giant conglomerate; the 87 million other good things you’ve done go away.

    Welcome to my unhappy club; let’s both get out fast.

    M

  • January 11, 2006 at 5:47 pm
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    Best of luck to one of the true class acts in the comic industry. Hang in there, Bob.

  • January 11, 2006 at 6:01 pm
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    Hey Bob, I wish you the best of luck. Beagle’s got his paws crossed:-)

  • January 11, 2006 at 6:04 pm
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    Bob,

    You don’t know me, but I know your work over the past many many years. I’m sorry to hear about this, and wish you and your family the best.

  • January 11, 2006 at 6:10 pm
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    I’m with Julio, this is DC’s loss. And it’s a shame. I don’t know why the folks at DC felt they had to do this, but as a fan I feel they made a bad move. I know the company as a whole has dropped a bit in my esteem because of this.

    Good luck and best wishes to you and your family.

  • January 11, 2006 at 6:33 pm
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    Very sorry to hear about you losing your job. It did not at all sound like it had much merit. You’ve done great things at DC with the publishing program. As Mark Waid says, let’s hope this will turn up a better opportunity for you down the road.

  • January 11, 2006 at 7:47 pm
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    I’m very sorry to hear about this and I wish you the best of luck in finding a position where your talents will be fully appreciated.

  • January 11, 2006 at 8:14 pm
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    Seems like a minor thing to get fired over. This is a lot different from when Marvel printed the first edition of the MARVEL MONSTERWORKS and every monster story on the contents page was credited to a reprint book instead of its first appearance (it was corrected in the reprints of that volume). Now that was incompetence and oversight which should have been caught by someone along the line. Was anyone fired over that?

  • January 11, 2006 at 9:59 pm
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    I’m new to this blog, but first noticed your work as editor of the Further Adventures of… short story anthologies of the early 1990s. Since then I’ve seen your name attached to so many DC projects that your name pretty much became synonymous with DC for me. Good luck in finding new gainful employment and hopefully one of the other publishers will see this as a golden opportunity to bring you on board.

    Andy E. Nystrom

  • January 11, 2006 at 10:15 pm
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    Bob:

    Let me add my good wishes to those already expressed here–and to the huge pool of goodwill out there toward you that goes unexpressed, too.

    Glad to hear you’re focusing on keeping as clear a head and as positive an attitude as is possible in these times. More than anything else, those’ll keep you where you need to be as you travel to the next step in your career.

    So, be good to yourself–and don’t forget to blog, particularly if you find yourself needing to remind yourself of that sense of community that surround you.

    Best,

    Ali

  • January 11, 2006 at 10:38 pm
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    Bob: My letter to your DC Comics addy may not get through, so I’ll give you the gist of it here: I’m damned sorry you lost a job you loved and were good at. I’ve been through joblessness myself, but to lose a job you’re really suited for…well, that’s the maximal hurt. I can’t give much besides sympathy, but if you need that, you’ve got it.

  • January 11, 2006 at 10:41 pm
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    Bob,

    A voice from the past come back to tell you that I think it stinks that you had to be “Scooter LIbby” for DC…if everyone got fired for the errors and late books that are rampant in this industry, there’d be no industry!!!!!

    “Life is what happens while you’re busy making other plans.”
    “Beautiful Boy” – John Lennon

    I have always found those words to be beautifully true, and they always give me the courage, irony and humor to carry on. Hope they help you.

    Mindy

  • January 11, 2006 at 10:41 pm
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    Now, this is just wrong, DC.

    Anyone in the industry who cares about the guys putting out books, knows about Bob. I’ve been following his stuff since the Post-Crisis revamps of 1986, and I’ve always admired Bob as both editor and author.

    Bob, it is their own damned loss. I can name a handful of people who’ve nicely blended their love and talent for comics, all experts or historians like Waid, Sanderson, Isabella, Busiek, Rozakis, or the late Mark Gruenwald and E. Nelson Bridwell. You are HIGH on that list of people who CARE about the stuff being produced because they were FANS first and foremost.

    You edited a great series, SUICIDE SQUAD, and your letter columns there were the icing on the cake of every issue. Marvel and DC are simply nuts for letting a guy like you go.

    And as Mark Waid said, if your freelance work is anything like the brilliant Bronze Tiger story you wrote for SQUAD, (issue #38, folks, pick it up!) you have a stellar comics writing career ahead of you. I am looking forward to hearing your name spoken alongside guys like Eisner and Miller soon.

    My very best wishes,

    Joe Tages

  • January 11, 2006 at 11:24 pm
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    I was sad and furious simultaneously when I heard the news. Sad for Bob and his family, and just plain mad at the lack of simple charity by DC. Their loss will be someone else’s gain.

  • January 12, 2006 at 12:55 am
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    Bob:

    You are a class act, and you will sail right through.

    Best,

    Heidi

  • January 12, 2006 at 8:21 am
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    Bob, you were a champion for Shelly Mayer, Scribbly, and the Red Tornado (and all of Shelly’s good works) at DC and for that alone you should be celebrated. You’re good folks.

    You were very, very nice to me the few times we emailed and when we met in person at the DC offices. That kindness is something I’ll never forget.

    Best wishes and good fortunes to you. I know what it feels like and I also know that sometimes change can be a good thing.

    Jim

  • January 12, 2006 at 8:45 am
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    I’m so very sorry to hear that Bob – you have been a very kind man and deserve everything to be well in your life. I wish you all the good luck at finding employment in the future and we shall stay in touch.

    Like Jim said above: Sometimes change can be a good thing. I’m learning that myself as well.

    -Zoee

  • January 12, 2006 at 8:47 am
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    As the original poster of the GA Hawkman error on Gormu’s site and at dc, I would like to say that I was only notifying others of this mistake to help them read the archive. Maybe if I hadn’t mentioned this…I dunno. I feel terrible. If you read my posts, I said i loved the archive the way it was (error and all) and recommded everyone buy it.

    Bob, You are great and I wish you all the best for your future! Good luck to you and your family!

    Doug in southern California

  • January 12, 2006 at 8:58 am
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    Bob,

    I just wanted to offer my sympathies also on this matter and I’m extremely sorry and upset to hear this happened.

    Bob, you’re one of the good guys in my book.

    Best regards and may tomorrow be a better day,
    Scott McCullar

  • January 12, 2006 at 9:38 am
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    I just learned about this today when I checked your blog. I’m really sorry to hear about this, Bob. I look up to you and you always took great care of me when you were on the sixth floor.

    Best of luck to you, pal. You’re nothing but pure class and I hope you land on your feet.

  • January 12, 2006 at 9:56 am
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    Bob-
    Ya know how Peter and I feel about the situation. I think it stinks like last weeks garbage or ripe diapers. I’m crossing my fingers and I know you’ll land on your feet. Best to Deb.
    Kath

  • January 12, 2006 at 10:45 am
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    Bob, I was sorry to hear about what happened. I’ve always enjoyed your ST writing. Best of luck for the future!

    Rich

  • January 12, 2006 at 11:04 am
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    Bob,
    I’m very sorry to hear about this.
    You printed some of my cartoons in Comics Scene way back in 1983, and you were really nice to me.
    I’m looking forward to your next great thing and, like others who’ve posted, I’m hoping it will be in the field of comics.

  • January 12, 2006 at 11:22 am
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    Very sorry to hear this, Bob. Your dedication was legendary, but as the esteemed Mr. Waid said, this could be a catalyst for bigger and better things. Make it so, pal.

  • January 12, 2006 at 11:30 am
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    Sadly, employers often don’t give second chances. Sometimes, they give less chances to more tenured employees than they do the newer folk…because more money is saved by letting go of people who have had a bunch of raises. Sorry to hear of your loss, especially in light of the circumstances. Try to enjoy the time off while you have it, though…because I find fairly often that the first day of work at a new job is, “dang it…I should have done X, Y, & Z when I had the chance!”

  • January 12, 2006 at 12:49 pm
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    Bob, I feel like I’ve said this before, but this blows, and I’m heartily sorry to hear it. You’ve always been a good friend to all us Gaijinners. Knowing you, though, you’ll end up somewhere even cooler. Of this, I’ve no doubt.

    Good luck to you, pal!

  • January 12, 2006 at 12:49 pm
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    Bob–
    Very sorry to hear this news. I don’t understand ANY situation that would involve letting you go. You do more work in ten minutes than most people do in a week. You’re organized, knowledgeable, and everyone likes you–because you’re a decent, fair, and honest guy.

    So WTF?

    Anyway, I know you’ll land on your feet!

    Chris

  • January 12, 2006 at 12:55 pm
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    Very, very sorry to hear this, Robert. I’ve always enjoyed working with you, and speaking with you even more. My very best wishes for you and your family in this difficult time.
    Gail

  • January 12, 2006 at 1:31 pm
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    I was shocked and saddened to hear this. Besides being an icon, you’ve been the perennial resource, strategist and cheerleader, a 20+ year asset for DC Comics and a treasure for the industry at large. This seems a sad example of corporate chimposity— not seeing the forest for the trees, that your true worth to DC and DC’s true investment in you have been grossly undervalued. I can’t begin to imagine what benefit firing you has to DC or how it could possibly outweigh the damage to DC’s image within the industry. This is terribly sad, for you, for them, for us.

    Luckily, as I and many others here have discovered, as you yourself know, leaving or being let go from one of the comics majors is by no means the end of the world. I have to believe a guy whose invested a great deal of time encouraging others has only good things in store for him.

    —Christopher Priest

  • January 12, 2006 at 2:44 pm
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    Bob,

    I’m not sure we’ve ever met, and we’ve certainly never worked together, but from things written both by you and about you it’s clear that you’ve been a class act in several not-always-classy businesses. (How well I remember the difficulties DC’s Trek line had in the ’89-92 period or so.)

    Best of luck for the future.

    Tim Lynch

  • January 12, 2006 at 2:59 pm
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    you did some great work to be much proud of, bob. poop def does happen. best of luck, of course– onward and upward!

  • January 12, 2006 at 3:01 pm
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    Bob,

    While I was only at DC for a year, you were one of the people that will forever stay in my mind from my time there. You always were kind, said hello, had time to chat, and made me feel welcome in a large company where it was hard enough to get everyone’s name straight. You helped shape my idea of what it is to be a comics professional as you are an excellent example of such. I am very sorry for this turn events but I’m certain you can find other opportunities for your talents.

    Lee Hammock

  • January 12, 2006 at 4:28 pm
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    Add me as one more fan of your work wishing you all the best in your future endeavors.

  • January 12, 2006 at 7:40 pm
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    Bob, keep your head up. You’re a good man.

  • January 12, 2006 at 7:43 pm
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    I am so shocked and sad to read your most recent news. You have shared your love of comics with readers the world over and I don’t think anyone can thank you enough. You never forgot what it was like to pick up a long awaited issue or go back and read your favorite much read comic.

    As for DC – well they blew it big time (as my daughter likes to say) and I don’t think I will ever look at them the same way again.

    And I know you well enough to know you have landed on your feet and will continue to make dreams come true. With that I wish you Deb, Rob, and Kate the best and I will see you soon!

  • January 12, 2006 at 7:56 pm
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    Bob,

    I know we’ve already had our personal email exchange, but this was something I wanted to say in front of a room full of people.

    In the damn-near-15 years I’ve been in the comics industry with you, it has been a privilege to think of you not only as a friend I made long before I got into the business, but also as a professional colleague.

    When things got tough for me work-wise, I can honestly say that’s one of the things that kept me from walking away: the knowledge that I worked in the same business as you.

    I still think of you as a colleague. The responses from some of the industry heavyweights here — and from your legion of fans — shows that I’m not alone.

    Whether you end up in comics or another branch of publishing, I await my colleague’s triumphant return.

  • January 12, 2006 at 8:14 pm
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    Bob, please email me at brockwaymetcalf at mac dot com so I can mail you your issues from various TPBs, and offer my best wishes. fondly–A

  • January 12, 2006 at 10:59 pm
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    As I’ve said before Bob, you’re the best. You are far too talented to be down too long. The outside world often values creative types more than the comics industry anyway. My best wishes for a sweeter new year.

  • January 12, 2006 at 11:03 pm
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    They say when one door closes, another one opens. May the next door lead you to major success!

    Best wishes from a former comic book retailer who has fond memories of the Star Trek comics that you edited for DC over 10 years ago!

  • January 13, 2006 at 1:11 am
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    bob. sorry to hear dc fired you over a mistake for this shows a little bit of hyprocrosy on dcs part for after all mistakes happend all the time and the higher ups who did this to you proably have done some doziez good luck in your next endevor.

  • January 13, 2006 at 2:43 am
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    Well I think you’re beyond swell, and bet you’re kept busy with something new and exciting before you know it. Big big hug…. Trish

  • January 13, 2006 at 6:54 am
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    Bob,
    Count me amongst all your supporters out there – even from so far away
    Jenny from Australia

  • January 13, 2006 at 8:03 am
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    This is rotten news Bob, I hope things quickly improve for you. It’s great that Deb and the family are so understanding.

    I’ve worked in UK comics and book publishing, I work in newspapers now, and I agree that given the volume of production, mistakes are bound to happen. People need to take a ‘there but for the grace of God’ approach and keep things in perspective.

    If you’re ever passing through Edinburgh, say hi!

  • January 13, 2006 at 8:57 am
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    This news came as a real shock to me. When I popped up to see you back in November, I obviously didn’t expect this to happen.
    Best of luck joining the ranks of us freelancers…

    best wishes

    Joel Meadows

  • January 13, 2006 at 10:10 am
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    Bob,

    I was truly shocked to hear of your being fired from DC. I really appreciate all the great things you have done for comics and for fans over the years, and especially the help you gave to me out of the DC Archives.

    I know from having been a school teacher for 31 years how the great things you do can be over-shadowed by a mistake made in error. Life can sure be the pits at times, but I pray that the good Lord will watch over you and yours, and allow this to be the beginning of something better.

    Craig

  • January 13, 2006 at 11:10 am
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    I was truly sorry when I heard the news. Bob was in on the ground floor of the now-burgeoning “graphic novel” business and a good deal of its current success is due to his efforts both as the collected editions editor and, in supporting me a few years back when I held the position. His encyclopedic knowledge and love for comics is legendary. DC’s loss will be profound. They just don’t know it. Bob was a pioneer in his unequivocal support of collected editions being something so much more than just reprints. We should remember that pioneers are the folks with arrows in their backs.

    Bob, I know you’ll come out of this just fine. You have the support of your family and legions of friends and colleagues.

  • January 13, 2006 at 12:47 pm
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    I’m so sorry and quite frankly shocked to hear this news. Given your experience and talent though I have every confidence you’re going to land on your feet.

    Keep your chin up!

  • January 13, 2006 at 6:51 pm
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    Not much for me to add, Bob, except to second each and every one of the good wishes above that are aimed in your direction. Y’know, I honestly didn’t realize the folks running DC these days were so clueless.

  • January 13, 2006 at 10:29 pm
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    Dang Bob, that sucks..

    If I see ya at Farpoint I’ll stand ya a drink.

  • January 14, 2006 at 10:34 am
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    I’m sorry to hear this has happened to you. It’s hard to believe.

    Thank you for all the good things you’ve done for us over the years. I’m sure that the handful of us who’re posting here aren’t the only ones who remember and appreciate you.

    I hope it’s not long before you’re looking back at this and feeling that the change was for the best.

  • January 14, 2006 at 10:47 am
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    Belated condolences, Bob. I was very sorry to hear about this.

    If you like, give me a call or email when things settle down & I’ll buy you lunch. Men of leisure like us should stick together.

    Best,
    Stuart

  • January 14, 2006 at 6:11 pm
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    Sorry to hear that Bob… I remember really enjoying one of your panels/talks at I-Con a couple years back. I seem to remember you giving me a soda, too.

    Although I’ll admit to not having bought an Archive in some time, I always thought that it was a great program and my friend Jim wrote a couple of the intros, which I enjoyed reading. I certainly don’t think that your dismissal bodes well for the program, and I hope that you find something new to do very soon.

  • January 14, 2006 at 6:22 pm
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    Bob,
    I’m sorry to hear about the turmoil in your life. All the times we worked together, whether I was Digtal’s art director or as a freelance penciller and inker, every experience has been positive and productive. Your input is one reason I still have warm feelings for DC. I think this is their loss and your next employer’s gain. By all means get in touch if there’s anything I can do.

    George

  • January 15, 2006 at 6:53 pm
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    bob;so sorry to hear that you were fired from D.C.!! i did a short stint of work for the company during the 80’s. and you were so nice enough to give me a shot at a trek-script!!! i know that you’ll find something else soon!!! it’s rare to find people that really care/love the buisness that they’re working in!! it’s really D.C.’s loss!! well—from one trek-fan to another— i know that “YOU’LL LIVE LONG AND PROSPER”!!! sincerly, mike clark!!!! {‘NUFF-SAID!!! }

  • January 18, 2006 at 1:22 pm
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    Hi, Bob.

    I’m sorry to hear of your recent dismissal. This is becoming all too common in this industry, one which fails to appreciate those who helped build and sustain it. You’ve always been a mensch in our dealings together and state for the world to read that you certainly ranked high on my list of favorite folks at DC Comics, and remain a pal o’ mine, so I look forward to keeping in contact. My best to you, amigo, and whatever I can do for ya, don’t hesitate to ask.
    Take care,
    Jon
    P.S. Can you e-mail direct? I need to talk about your CBA comp, as well as another matter. Thanks!

  • January 19, 2006 at 10:26 am
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    Dear Bob,

    We’ve never met, but I’ve been a fan of your comics work and your novels for quite some time. So, I thought I’d pop up anonymously to say something.

    As someone who is not in the comics industry, I have to say that I’ve never seen such an outpouring for a colleague dismissed by any companies in my industry.

    Suffice it to say, you’re obviously deeply respected, and I imagine this respect will translate into work sooner than later.

    Keep your chin up, sir! Even a guy who’s never met you can tell you’re one of the Good Guys.

    Ben

  • January 22, 2006 at 4:48 pm
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    I’m coming to this a little late but I’m sorry to hear this Bob!

    Good luck in your future and I await your next Trek novel!

    Gord

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