I’ve Been Going Door to Door

Every neighborhood in Fairfield has its own personality and in a dense district like the one I live in, there are many segments making it always fun to go campaigning. First of all, there’s the pleasure of seeing different parts of the district as well as revisiting some favorite streets and neighbors.

The response, as you might imagine, does vary as well. Up until recently, the best way to describe the reaction of voters has been “aware of the election but not engaged with it”. That seems to have changed in the last week, which is good considering we have about a week left. I’m impressed by the number of voters who told me they were hanging on to the just-received League of Women’s Voting Guide which arrived on Friday. Several, though, were disappointed to learn the Representative Town Meeting candidates were not profiled. After all, that is as local as it gets and with ten to pick from, some voters want information.

Going to door to door means lots of bored, harried, rushed, or disinterested voters. I have encountered some who only seem vaguely aware of the issues in our part of town, such as the Little League renovations at Gould Manor Park. Several were bothered by the waste of money until they were told all the work was being paid for by the Little League and no tax dollars were being expended. Then they were fine with it – since, after all, we get two remediated fields as a result.

On Friday, I hit the streets ahead of the impending storm, and was thrilled by the reactions I received. These were friendly people, several interested in my thoughts or why I wanted to run. I knocked on the doors of Republicans, Democrats and Independents, getting reasonably positive responses across the board. I hit some of the smaller side streets and one man said, “Anyone coming to my door gets my vote.” Three others made a point of saying they appreciate having candidates knocking on doors.

I remain convinced going door to door is the best way to campaign locally.

Sunday I went out again and it felt more like a lit drop walk than actual campaigning. So many people were not home and those I did speak with had little to say about the town. Most seemed satisfied and couldn’t come up with an issue of concern other than the universal complaint about taxes. We discussed them as a necessary evil and the hope that the new regime, whoever it will be, valued engineered town government so future increases were minimal. No one was foolish enough to think we could cut taxes meaning our area is a reasonable one.

There are eight days to go and only a few more opportunities to hit the streets. I look forward to the final push, followed by standing at the polls to greet one and all.

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