Me and the Attorney General

Since I’ve gotten involved in local politics, I have found myself attending numerous events where several of the state leaders turn up. They breeze in and are usually mobbed by those they know and they seem to know a lot of the party faithful.

When you work on enough campaigns and attend the same events, your orbits wind up synchronizing with one another.

Having never worked on the state campaigns, I have been somewhere out in the distant realms, so time after time, I find myself being reintroduced to these people, which is fine. After all, I haven’t given them money or walked the streets on their behalf or done similar services. Still, I appreciate that when we hold our annual Century Club brunch, they turn out in number, genuinely happy to (briefly) be there.

When I was serving as Moderator of the Representative Town Meeting, my status was raised enough that when I was next introduced to some, such as Attorney General Richard Blumenthal, they paused to absorb the information. Blumenthal even went so far as to say that if he or his office could be of any service I shouldn’t hesitate to reach out. At the time, I had no clue how I might need his services, but it was nice to know the offer was out there.

And as it turned out, as moderator, I never needed an opinion from any attorney other than our town attorneys.

(Let me pause and express my admiration for the job he has done as the state’s AG these last 20 years. Both only has he turned the office into a proactive one for the consumer, he has tirelessly attended hundreds of rubber chicken events a year for two decades. He extends himself town by town and has a staff attending to needs both great and small. The kerfuffle over the handful of misstatements about his service as a reserve means he’s not perfect.  Even with this mortal flaw, he is still light years ahead of his opponent in terms of qualified to be a senator.)

Now that I am no longer an elected official, but serve as Vice-Chair of the local Democratic Town Committee, I have had increased face time with the officials and candidates who desire to be officials. During the run up to the state convention, it was cool getting personal calls from Dan Malloy, Mary Glassman, and others.

It never seemed that ones I had met repeatedly in the past ever recalled. Well, that finally changed last night.

I have no clue how, but I was one of the very few Fairfielders invited to what turned out to be a major Bridgeport fundraiser for Blumenthal’s senatorial campaign. There were about a hundred of us in a restaurant, with most knowing one another, backslapping and having a grand old time. Thankfully, I ran into Anne Phillips, one of Bridgeport’s reps to the Greater Bridgeport Regional Planning Agency, where I currently represent Fairfield.

As we chatted, she in turn introduced me to Mayor Bill Finch since we were discussing a GBRPA issue that he was interested in. But, as happens at these events, we spent about 90 seconds in conversation on the matter, when the mayor was interrupted to talk to someone else and things ground to a halt.

Later, on my way out, I was thanking one of the night’s sponsors when Blumenthal made his way to us and did a round of hellos. The host was distracted by someone so the attorney general turned to me and said, “You’ve been going to a lot of events…” or something like that, indicating he really knew me as an individual. We began talking about the task of campaigning but as he began waxing nostalgic, he was interrupted and yet another conversation went unfinished.

At least I know that the next time we’re together, I can continue the conversation and he will put it into context.

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