Saturday Night Antics

The Indianapolis Children’s Museum is amazing. Only the current exhibits on the second level were open to the public Saturday night, but they showed the care and wonder they bring to the facility. The entire main lobby and second level were open for the Forrest’s reception.

The second level had two exhibits of note: a Cartoon network-sponsored hall that had terrific interactive tools to show how animated cartoons are created. They had memorabilia from the early Hanna-Barbera days through the current fare on the channel. Around the corner, though, was the hall dedicated to Comic Books and Super-Heroes. A local fan passed away in his 20s and his parents donated his 20,000 comic collection to the museum along with promo posters and the like. They went out and got additional things to show among them, a lobby display of a life-size Silver Surfer from the feature film, a cape worn by Adam West from Batman and one of the eight tumblers constructed for Batman Begins.

There were comics, merchandise, promo posters and the like, all on display. You could see how comics are created, here people wax nostalgic about reading different genres from Archie to X-Men. Play costumes to try on in front of a mirror, trivia quizzes and plenty more. Wander it brought a big smile to my face and I was thrilled to see titles I edited or worked on among the comics throughout the hall.

Now, once we got through the cocktail hour, we all were seated and had the ceremonial lighting of the candles. In many cases, these are 13 candles atop a cake, celebrating the celebrant’s thirteenth birthday and ascension into manhood. The kid reads cheesy rhymes or heartfelt words about each representative and they come up to carefully selected theme music, light candle, hug the kid, mug for the camera and return to our seats.

When we were called, I broke into a broad grin and started laughing out loud at the first note. Deb looked at me and then recognized the theme to Star Trek. I proudly displayed the Vulcan salute, enjoying the selection, Deb lit the candle, and we mugged for camera and returned to our seats.

The rest of the affair was fairly typical although the deejay catered to the 25 and under set with a relentless barrage of rap, dance music, and disco. There was all of one song written before 1980 and nothing for folks of the oldest generation to dance to. I was very conscious of this since the exact same omission occurred at a family wedding in May. Ah well.

Sunday morning was the farewell brunch for out of towners and it was great because it really gave us a chance to mingle and hash through family news and gossip. My cousin Alan, the family archaeologist, brought along pictures and documents, hoping to get help identifying people from a century earlier. He also handed me a folder of letters, telling me they were the only copies, but I should read through them and see if there was a book in the story the letters told. It has to do with a cousin I never heard of, who seemed involved in selling draft deferments and wound up doing fifteen years amidst corruption from the judge on down if family lore was to be believed. I will read these, do a little on line research and see if he’s right. It certainly comes at a good time.

Once we ate, we packed and returned to the lobby for a final visit with whoever was left. Our trip to the airport was zippy and we got through rental return, electronic check-in and security without issue. I type this from 20,000 feet up, en route to Washington before connecting back to White Plains and then home. All in all, it was a good weekend and great see family.

One comment

  • Susan O

    If you liked the Hanna-Barbera memoribilia, Bob, then you should check out the Barker Cartoon Museum in Cheshire. It’s quite the trip down memory lane. Their store is amazing.

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