Tangible Support

We’ve been overwhelmed by e-mails, postings, letters, cards and the like from so many of you. Many have offered their help and for the most part, those not in the immediate area are limited in how they can be of service to Robbie and/or the family.

The bigger picture, though, does offer options. One is donating blood. There’s never enough and it’s always in demand.

Another option was conceived by my delightful daughter who just posted over at her blog. It’s a worthy cause and the goodies could be fun, too.

Thanks for your support and continued thoughts and prayers.

7 comments

  • Bob, I wandered over from Katie’s knitting blog. I am going through this same journey with my son. Our world changed on November 26. He has been in the hospital ever since. First induction therapy didn’t work. Transplant only option. Second chemo round finished 10 days ago and we are waiting, waiting, waiting…for the tests, for news on possible marrow donors, for the fevers and infections to ease up. You name it infections post chemo, plus two rounds of drug resistant staph infections. Heart and kidneys affected, and those fevers. You know all this. I read your posts and you have echoed every emotion I have been through. Rote work is possible and even necessary, critical thinking is momentarily out of my range.

    I did want to mention that you should encourage everyone who can to register as a potential marrow donor. Explain how the process has simplified, how drilling for marrow is no longer necessary. And they can save lives. We are setting up a website for my son to inform and encourage people to become donors.

    There is so much more I could tell you. Steven was misdiagnosed for months. He even underwent knee surgery for the joint pain, when it was the leukemia which was causing the problem. His several doctors never ordered a simple blood panel which would have shown the abnormalities. His hemaglobin was 3 when I finally insisted he go to the emergency room, evidently set a record. And even then his doctor thought it was from internal bleeding, with no symptom of that whatsoever.

    Please, accept my heartfelt sympathy and best wishes for what your family and Robbie are going through. I hope your journey is simpler than ours. There are cures. There are people who come through this and lead normal healthy lives. May Robbie be one of those.

  • Bob, I wandered over from Katie’s knitting blog. I am going through this same journey with my son. Our world changed on November 26. He has been in the hospital ever since. First induction therapy didn’t work. Transplant only option. Second chemo round finished 10 days ago and we are waiting, waiting, waiting…for the tests, for news on possible marrow donors, for the fevers and infections to ease up. You name it infections post chemo, plus two rounds of drug resistant staph infections. Heart and kidneys affected, and those fevers. You know all this. I read your posts and you have echoed every emotion I have been through. Rote work is possible and even necessary, critical thinking is momentarily out of my range.

    I did want to mention that you should encourage everyone who can to register as a potential marrow donor. Explain how the process has simplified, how drilling for marrow is no longer necessary. And they can save lives. We are setting up a website for my son to inform and encourage people to become donors.

    There is so much more I could tell you. Steven was misdiagnosed for months. He even underwent knee surgery for the joint pain, when it was the leukemia which was causing the problem. His several doctors never ordered a simple blood panel which would have shown the abnormalities. His hemaglobin was 3 when I finally insisted he go to the emergency room, evidently set a record. And even then his doctor thought it was from internal bleeding, with no symptom of that whatsoever.

    Please, accept my heartfelt sympathy and best wishes for what your family and Robbie are going through. I hope your journey is simpler than ours. There are cures. There are people who come through this and lead normal healthy lives. May Robbie be one of those.

  • Jamie Millington

    Bob,

    Our thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

    Jamie and Kelly Millington

  • Susan O

    I’ve been on the Marrow registry for @ 10 years. Perhaps people don’t realize it’s just a simple blood sample to get on the registry – not painful at all, and you may just save a life. They are especially desperate for minority registrants, as there are certain blood factors more common in certain ethnic groups that can make or break a transplant.

    Also, new blood donors are in constant need because regular donors can fall off the list. My father, who has his gallon pin, is no longer able to be a donor due to being a cancer survivor. I dropped off the list at one point due to medications I was taking. Each blood donation saves three lives: it’s a win-win-win situation.

    The only bummer is that the Red Cross is very tightly regionalized. If you are from one region, and donate blood in another (such as at the Shoreleave blood drive), it will not show up on your home-region donation count.

  • Barb Goetz

    Bob,

    I am starting to stitch something for you to auction at Shore Leave with the proceeds going to the Leukemia Society. Hope it helps. See you in July.

  • Jim

    I have been on the marrow registry for years as well. My brother has already donated marrow. My thoughts and prayers are with you and your family.

  • Bob Fleming

    Bob–
    I found your blog for the first time tonight when I was reading about Steve Gerber’s untimely death on COMICS REPORTER and noticed your link. I’m very sorry to read about your son’s illness, Bob, and if there’s anything I can do to help you through this tough time, please don’t hesitate to ask. I remember the many kindnesses you extended to me during our days at DC. You’re a good guy, and you deserve all the support you’re getting.
    Bob Fleming