The Floor is now Open

Not much going on to chat about so I figured I would throw the floor open to questions. Feel free to ask about Weekly World News, any already announced projects, my government life or baseball. I’ll gather the questions over the next few days and then post the answers.

Meantime, I had a very productive meeting yesterday on the unannounced project. It has finally solidiifed in form and content, although there’s a lot of new work to be done to shape the 78% already written to conform to my editor’s wishes. Additionally, my end needs to be done and turned in by August 31 so a deadline really exists. I’ll be a very busy boy this summer.

So of course, that also means one of my other dormant projects has come to life. I’m very happy to say that this week work has begun on a sequel story to “Things that Aren’t,” the story Michael A. Burstein and I had published in Analog a few months back. Every day this week, I’ve been getting chunks of the first draft and it’s neat seeing it come to life.

Interestingly, Michael writes in a non-linear manner. He writes scenes that he feels ready to write whether the occur in the beginning, middle or end of the story. As a result, I see gaps and wonder what will happen next. I also see written scenes that I know I want to play with. I warned him about my schedule and that I need to see a finished draft before I get to tinkering since, after all, he could have something in mind for an unwritten scene that may be spoiled if I change a set-up in a previous scene. I think it’ll be for the best but it’s neat to see it come together.

2 comments

  • Jim

    Bob, I am a huge fan of WWN’s “Matthew Daemon” stories and comics, though sadly I’ve missed a few in their run. Is there any chance of putting them together in an archive collection, say a special edition issue of the WWN or an online archive on your website? Thanks.

  • Paul1963

    Sounds like Michael Burstein writes like I sometimes do when I have time to devote to a writing project–or when I force myself to sit down with the sketchbook and draw something.
    “Hey, what if the character said this?”
    That comes much later in the story.
    “Yeah, but I want to write it now.
    But how does he get to that point?
    “I’ll figure that out later. Where’s something to write with…?”
    Years ago, I roughed-out a 52-page graphic novel that started out as a one-page gag that I later decided was page six. Trying to get to that point in the story in only five pages was a challenge, and I was really proud that I only had to rewrite one line of dialogue on the original page to make it fit.
    I did pages 6-7, 10-52, 1-5 and 8-9, in that order, all in a sketchbook. Took years.