The Political Roller Coaster

Last week I stated I hated political rah-rah events, noting they are messy, longer-than-necessary affairs.

Well, last night, I participated in a local political event that was rah-rah but far more focused and effective.

Prior to the beginning of our monthly Democratic Town Committee meeting we had the 132nd Caucus to nominate our candidate to run for state legislature. We scheduled it for 15 minutes and it took 20 but we kept things moving along. Once we did the obligatory nonsense of picking a chair and a secretary, I rose to give the nominating speech. Recognizing this was to energize the electorate around the candidate, I wrote a one-page speech that seemed to achieve its goal. Tom Drew, our three-term incumbent, smiled and seemed pleased with my words.

Two others gave brief secondary speeches and then Tom spoke and kept things moving.

After that, we had a 10 minute session to select our candidate for Judge of the Probate Court. For the first time in years, we had someone to challenge the long-serving Republican judge and Pamela Jones was enthusiastically endorsed. I rose again to second the nomination.

We then had out regular meeting where, of course, the buzz was all about the court smacking down Susan Bysiewicz’s bid for nomination to run as Attorney General. Her political career has ground to a halt as a series of public gaffes have come back to haunt someone considered a shoe-in just weeks earlier.

And we buzzed about the political hay being made about Richard Blumenthal’s verbal mistakes. I spent time discussing this during the day and even debating it on Twitter with some surprising folk. The bottom line for me is that his actions have spoken volumes louder than his words and will still win the election. Linda McMahon’s actions surrounding this only provides Blumenthal ammunition as the months drag on.

The final key discussion was about our own Ken Flatto and his bid to be the state’s next comptroller. He announced days after two other Democrats and the town machine had to gear up to help him get the word out in time for the vote at Saturday’s state democratic convention. He needs just under 300 votes to reach the 15% necessary to get on the ballot for the August primary.

I spent this morning calling 30 delegates from Newington, spreading the word, chatting up his credentials and qualifications. I suddenly went from recipient of endless calls from all the other state candidates and their aides to being one of those callers. It all felt very odd.

Despite serving the public since 1997, I’ve never been so active in the process and find it utterly fascinating and utterly frustrating.

2 comments

  • Bill Mulligan

    “verbal mistakes”?
    .
    “I wore the uniform in Vietnam and many came back to all kinds of disrespect. Whatever we think of war, we owe the men and women of the armed forces our unconditional support.”
    .
    He lied. he lied in a way that is particularly revealing about what kind of person he is. maybe he is still the best person that Connecticut can offer for the position. But to dismiss this as a verbal mistake is to invite further lies. No wonder our political class is so deficient, when good people continue to make excuses for them.

  • I will note one thing about Blumenthal. It is true that he is a veteran, and has done a lot for veterans and their rights. But this verbal gaffe is a very difficult one for him to get around. He needs to apologize more sincerely, and other people need to play up all the good work he has done if he wants a chance to be elected.

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