Week Two Begins

Things are stable at the moment and we’ve all fallen into a routine as we begin week two in our new reality.

Robbie is on day five of his ten day aggressive chemo therapy and is responding well enough. After a stay in the ICU, it looks promising that he will be transferred out in the next day or two. The various medications seem to be doing their part and for the last two days, he’s done little more than sleep and visit with guests, including his best friend since kindergarten, Brooke, who came back from Vermont just to see him. Still, all the signs are pointing to the positive but not without some areas of concern. He’s breathing better and has been cleared to eat solids again. But has not real appetite. His pain has decreased markedly but still needs to be managed.

For the still-in-shock parents, we’ve got our own routine. One of us goes home around 8-9 at night to tend to the house, mail and pets. The other spends the night in the room with him and depending upon the night that can mean anywhere from 3-6 hours of sleep but never consecutively. He continues to need vital signs checked, IV bags replaced, medicine delivered, etc. As a result, IV pumps beep for attention or Robbie wakes up asking to use the bathroom, which is quite the process given the tubes and wires currently attached to him – which is down from two days ago.

During the day, if he’s awake we chat or try and watch something on DVD together. As visitors come, we let them have some private time with Robbie so we retreat to a family lounge down the hall, monitoring the time to make certain he’s not being overtaxed. So far, he’s seen some family but mostly his friends and they have been wonderful with regards to following the hospital and parental protocols.

When he’s not awake, we use the wi-fi to check in with the world. I’ve been doing a ton of e-mail, trying to respond to all the well wishers and trying to keep tabs on most of my freelance responsibilities. Proofreading both The Essential Batman Encyclopedia, and Christina Aguilera have progressed since they’re easy to pick up and put down on a moment’s notice.

The Microsoft project, launching Monday, has moved ahead and I have come to realize I can do mechanical stuff but critical thinking is just not something I have the spare energy for. So, I do what I can there and will fit in my other work as I can. Thankfully, my various editors have all been wonderful.

As has Skyler Technologies, Deb’s company. She keeps in touch and actually managed to listen to a conference call but they are letting her dictate how and when she can get work done. You cannot ask for better employers.

So, we’re tired and holding up. Friends and family have helped keep us fed as we deplete the refrigerator at home. We steal time to chat with one another but basically, we keep watch. We learn what we can absorb from the different doctors and nurses, all of whom have been terrific. Doctors and nurses not even on duty have stopped by to check on him which is marvelous.

His spirit remains strong and he continues to crack the occasional joke so we take it encouraging signs.

4 comments

  • Glad to see all’s well enough thus far, Bob. Hoping that everything improves from here onwards!

  • Tim Lynch

    It’s times like these when you really discover whether an employer is good or bad. When my mother was fighting cancer my school was terrific — it was always “do what you need to do, we’ll take care of things.”

    I’m glad things are off to a good start — here’s hoping it continues an upward trend.

    TWL

  • Laura Quish

    I am so sorry to hear about Robbie’s illness. I am, however, heartened to hear that he is dealing with it so well and he is so strong! I’m sending prayers and good thoughts to your whole family.

  • Jerri

    I’ve been reading about your son via Kathleen and Peter’s blogs… and with nothing shared between us but parenthood, know that prayers are being said for the healing, comfort and strength of you all.