While I’m at Lunacon

While I’m at Lunacon this weekend, with a full slate of panels all day Saturday and two back-to-back on Sunday, let me direct you to some of my current columns over at ComicMix.

Last weekend, I chatted with Moonstone’s Joe Gentile about his prose anthologies. As you know, I’ve contributed to his Phantom book and am working on stories for both The Avenger and Captain Midnight.

Early in the week, I mused on what the success of 300 might mean.

Then, this morning, my column on Direct to DVD animation went live.

It’s kinda neat being a columnist, something that sort of happened as my relationship with ComicMix has grown. Hope you find them as entertaining to read as I find writing them.

One comment

  • Bob, two very interesting columns on the comic book movie calendar and the burgeoning animated direct-to-DVD market. I wanted to make some comments on the latter.

    About four years ago a company (whose name I am completely blanking on at the moment) released several CrossGen series in a DVD format as something of a slideshow with a soundtrack. I’d love to know who the buyer at the corporate office was that thought these were a great idea because we had solid quantities on all of these in the stores and they didn’t sell. (I bought the Scion DVDs when they went way cheap when the company wanted them gone.) I thought the concept was interesting, just that the choice of material wasn’t. I mean, really. CrossGen?

    The recent trend toward using an animated direct-to-DVD short or long film to promote a big-budget event film has been ongoing for several years and not limited to just comics related properties. Van Helsing and Chronicles of Riddick both had animated DVDs released to promote the films, and I dare say that the animated Van Helsing was better than the live-action Van Helsing. But as with Brainiac Attacks, if it’s done for purely cash-in purposes on the cheap, it’s not really serving any useful cross-promotion purpose, not when in the case of Superman, there was already a lot of other DVD product, animated and otherwise, on store shelves. That may be something the movie studios aren’t considering–do they really need to commission an animated film to cash-in on their summer blockbuster when they already have better quality product in the retail channel? On the other hand, they may be wanting to have a whole range of products at different price points, and a one-off animated short would be at the entry level/impulse purchase price, regardless of quality.

    Excellent columns, Bob! Looking forward to reading more. 🙂